Five Fact Friday: Reflections of You

~i have been a rockclimber for twenty-five years~
~one time i spent two nights and three days on a "big wall" in Yosemite~
~i also spent three months hiking the appalachian trail alone; i was 19~
~i heat my entire house (600 sq. feet) with this little lovely "Fatso"~
~i have a thing for photographing bones~
~sometimes i have to drive across flash flood areas to get to and from town~
~i have an amazing family~
Ni Hao Yall

cowboy cabin for an introvert

it is no secret i am an introvert; not to be confused with a misanthrope.  i love humans and i love my friends.  
  introverts are often drained of energy after lengthy interactions with other humans; contrast this to extroverts who are energized by being with groups.  
introverts think deeply; talk sparingly.
introverts love solitude; they love quiet; they love home.
enter the wilderness cabin (aka:  the bunkhouse), my dream for introversion.  
it's where i hope to go to recover.
to replenish the spirit.
this particular dreamy cabin is about 300 sqare feet of
remote, rustic minimalist living.
cabin is in an undisclosed location in the mountains of Arizona. 

poop with a view

deep in a forest in the mountains of central arizona is my special wild place.
the only eyes around to watch the outhouse in use are the cows, mountain lions, coyotes, squirrels, flying and crawling critters.
i love this outhouse; and, yes, i do use it from time to time.

My Heart's Desire

~deep in the mountains of north-central Arizona is a cabin peeking from the woods~
~surrounded by meadows and ponderosa trees~
~I dream of this place~
~in my dream, I call it HOME.~

Tiny Things I Love

I am in Love.  
And I give thanks for my life everyday!
Some people focus on things they don't want, don't like or don't have.
For most of my life (with rare exceptions) I have focused on what I love, what I have, and the infinite POSSIBILITIES of what may be.

Right this moment I Love the smell of monsoon rain on dry soil and Ponderosa trees, dragonflies, my family, the perfection of nature at work, the late afternoon sun across the meadow, using solar power, being able to see, being able to run, being able to hold the creatures I love (human and otherwise,) silence, laughter, fruit on the pear trees, shade, water, fresh garden veggies, cream from Sola (for my coffee) and.. oh yeah, My Coffee!
What are you grateful for?

Antique Stove Perfection

This is the exquisite stove I have been in love with for six years.  It is held together with a piece of cord (door doesn't shut), has no working pilot (burnt fingers), and can't regulate heat (burnt cookies.) 
One of the coolest things about this stove is the ability to use propane (right side) and wood (left side.) 
This lovely appliance has taken care of my family (since 2005) in our off-the-grid cabin in the national forest.  
After this summer, I will no longer have the pleasure of closing my stove with a piece of cord and a fastex clip.  I will be leaving Walnut Creek (as a home) and will only be coming out twice a week to visit my horses .  
I dedicate this summer to photographing and writing about all the simple and precious things that have blessed my life since the day I first met this land.
I used a scratched metal texture on this photo for emphasis. Editing was done in Photoshop, Aperture and Nik Color Efex Pro.

Horses


Today I went for a sunny run through my beloved mountains after a morning of studying. The dogs trotted along, dodging in and out of bushes and trees.  I run in the mountains with only my dogs. It is a solitary and deeply fulfilling experience.  Running through forests without trails, over boulders and through creeks reminds me of the path I have chosen with horses. The path is in my heart; it is not clear; it is not paved or well traveled. I have to go with the feel, stay strong.

I found the work of Alexander Nevzorov a couple years ago while searching for a deeper way to be with my horses. Everything I found in the school’s teaching was already in my heart. I had stopped using bits, bridles and saddles years ago, even stopped riding.  Becoming a student of the school was like finding a long lost friend. I could finally breathe and be myself.

Now, I spend time just hanging with my horses; I let them come to me instead of going to get them. They are no longer tools or objects for my recreation. We stretch together, lay in the sun together, go on walks together, and play games.  We work on simple cordeo (loose neck cord) turns and stops from the ground, pedestal exercises, tail (back) to hand, lift and hold the leg up.  I trim their feet (no shoes), study Equine Anatomy and Physiology, and do a lot of reflecting on why I have horses in my life. I love the strength and beauty in them.  I love the relationship.  I no longer want to control them, and they know this.  Now, they will do almost anything I ask of them.  The difference is that now I ask.  They, as individual beings, have a right to refuse.  We have developed something that is rare and beautiful (and odd, I might add, to traditional horse people.)  But that is the beauty of individuality and finding your own path.

Most of my life has been lived outside the mainstream. I am used to doing things differently and because of this I am always on the outskirts (literally and figuratively.)  I live in a cabin in a secluded national forest valley nestled between two mountain ranges and wilderness areas. My family, my animal friends and this land are my best friends.